Saturday, July 13, 2013

ANOTHER LOSS IN THE QUILT WORLD

The quilt world has had a flurry of sad news lately......another instructor colleague has passed away.  Perhaps many of you own her books or experienced her witty lectures.  She had quite an impact on our industry.  The following will or has appeared in Quilter's Newsletter......

Mary Ellen Hopkins
Quilting teacher, author and fabric designer Mary Ellen Hopkins died July 9 in California. Hopkins was born in Peoria, Illinois, lived in a number of Midwestern cities while growing up, and attended Drury College and Missouri University. She and her husband, Bill, and their four children moved to Santa Monica, California, in 1963. Hopkins worked from home for a few years making men’s shirts before opening the Crazy Ladies and Friends Quilt Shop in Santa Monica in 1977.
In 1989 she self-published her first book, The It’s Okay If You Sit on My Quilt Book,which she called an “attitude adjustment quilt book” and Quilters Newsletter described as, “Great for beginners – takes quilts out of the realm of preciousness and encourages just jumping in and doing it.” Hopkins went on to publish more instruction books including her “Connector” series. After 20 years of quilt shop ownership, Hopkins sold her shop to teach and lecture around the U.S. and internationally. Her topics included quilting seminars for teachers and shop owners and neighborhood-shop seminars for consumers, all delivered with her trademark high-energy, humorous style.



3 comments:

Shasta Matova said...

That book helped give me comfort that I too could make quilts. It is a sad loss. I haven't met her, but I have learned a great deal from her.

Robbie said...

Oh my gosh!!! I used to watch her on TV!!! I had her book years ago...not sure what I did with it..might still have it or I gave it to our guild!!! She was a hoot! And for a little woman...just a fireball!!!

TheaM said...

She lectured (early 90's, I think) at Amador Valley Quilters where she inspired many of the members (including me!) with her unusual techniques and humor. She is one of the 'founding mothers' of the quilt movement.